NWCCD 2018-19 Catalog 
    
    Apr 05, 2020  
NWCCD 2018-19 Catalog [This is an Archived Catalog.]

Courses


 
  
  •  

    CRMJ 2150 - Introduction to Victimology


    This course focuses on the criminal justice system’s treatment of crime victims, victim programs and services, and the impact of victimization on individuals and communities. An overview of victim assistance programs, victim remedies, and victim rights, including civil and criminal solutions, will be presented.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
  
  •  

    CRMJ 2160 - Domestic Violence


    This course examines the theories, issues, legal strategies and intervention applicable to abuse in intimate relationships.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
    Prerequisites:
    SOC 1000 Sociological Principles or SOC/CRMJ 2400 Criminology, or instructor consent

  
  •  

    CRMJ 2175 - Sexual Assault


    This course addresses theories, issues, legal strategies, and intervention treatment and prevention programs of sexual assault. The myths, statistics, services, treatment, and prevention will be discussed. Both the adult rapist and the adolescent offender will be profiled.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
  
  •  

    CRMJ 2200 - Constitutional Law


    This course examines the powers of the government as they are allocated and defined by the United States Constitution, with an intensive analysis of the United States Supreme Court decisions as they impact society and the criminal justice system.  It explores the United States Constitution historically and contemporarily, the application of the Bill of Rights, the 14th Amendment and conducts an intensive analysis of United States Supreme Court decisions.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CRMJ 2200 Constitution Law, the student will:

    1. Recognize the 14th Amendment as a limitation on State power.
    2. Differentiate between protected speech and unprotected speech.
    3. Recognize law enforcement actions that constitute a seizure.
    4. Apply the legal concept of probable cause to fact-based situations.
    5. Recognize law enforcement actions that constitute a search.
    6. Apply the appropriate constitutional protections to custodial interrogations.
    7. Evaluate the need for a warrant to fact-based situations.
    8. Recognize when the right to counsel attaches to the criminal trial process.
    9. Critique the application of rights to criminal defendants and criminal procedure as defined by the US Constitution.


    Program Outcomes
    Upon completion of CRMJ 2200 Constitution Law, the student will:

    PO#2 Critique the application of rights to criminal defendants as defined by the US Constitution.

  
  •  

    CRMJ 2205 - Constitutional Rights of Inmates


    This course is an overview of the constitutional rights of inmates including civil and criminal liabilities, legal services and disciplinary proceedings.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
  
  •  

    CRMJ 2210 - Criminal Law I


    This course is an in-depth examination of the basic elements of criminal culpability as well as the legal definitions of the elements of criminal law as defined by court interpretations.  Defenses, justifications, and excuses are discussed.  Crimes against people and property are covered.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CRMJ 2210 Criminal Law I, the student will:

    1. Identify the nature and origins of criminal law in our society.
    2. Recognize the constitutional limitations of criminal law.
    3. Differentiate between procedural criminal law and substantive criminal law.
    4. Examin the basic elements of criminal culpability including actus reus, mens rea, causation and concurrence.
    5. Analyze parties to a crime and vicarious liability.
    6. Examine the affirmative defenses of justification and excuse.
    7. Analyze the inchoate crimes of attempt, conspiracy, and solicitation.
    8. Assess the criminal elements of crimes against persons, property, and public order.
    9. Assess the criminal elements of crimes against the state including terrorism and espionage.


    Program Outcomes
    Upon completion of CRMJ 2210 Criminal Law I, the student will:

    PO#3 Examine the basic elements of criminal culpability including actus reus, mens rea, causation and concurrence.

  
  •  

    CRMJ 2300 - Counseling Skills


    This course is designed to examine the concepts and skills of counseling. It defines the role of the counselor. Students analyze appropriate counseling techniques. Students identify appropriate guidance to clients within the criminal justice system. Students differentiate the counselor’s role within the criminal justice field. Students develop counseling skills to be used in the field.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
    Prerequisites:

    Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 1010 English I



    Cross-listed: CNSL 2300 and SOC 2300 - Counseling Skills

  
  •  

    CRMJ 2350 - Introduction to Corrections


    The history and evolution of the corrections process covering all aspects of institutional and community-based corrections is covered in this course.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
  
  •  

    CRMJ 2360 - Community Based Corrections


    This course is an analysis of community based correctional programs and procedures with emphasis on environment and the relationship to public safety, rehabilitation, and punishment.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
  
  •  

    CRMJ 2375 - Class & Treatment of Offenders


    This course introduces the student to the process through which the custodial, educational, vocational, and treatment needs of the offender are determined. Topics include interview, case diagnosis, use of testing programs as classification aids, reception and diagnostic centers, principles of the treatment process, and treatment approaches.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
  
  •  

    CRMJ 2400 - Criminology


    This course examines the study of the biological, sociological and psychological theories of the causes of criminal behavior. It differentiates the practice of criminal justice from the practice of criminology. The causes of crimes against persons, crimes against property, organized crime, white-collar crime, drug crime, cybercrime, and terrorism are examined. Victimology and the social consequences of victimization are discussed. Crime control strategies based upon theoretical causes are developed.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture

    General Education Requirement: Social and Behavioral Sciences
    Comments: This course does not meet UW’s Human Culture requirement unless transferred as part of an Associate degree.

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CRMJ 2400/SOC 2400 Criminology, the student will:

    1. Differentiate between criminal justice and criminology.
    2. Analyze the biological theories of the causes of crime.
    3. Analyze the sociological theories of the causes of crime.
    4. Analyze the psychological theories of the causes of crime.
    5. Compare crime control approaches in society.
    6. Apply crime theories to the study of individual criminal profiles.
    7. Develop crime control strategies to counter criminal behavior.
    8. Identify the social consequences of victimization.
    9. Discuss victimology and how it can be used to prevent crime.


    Program Outcomes
    Criminal Justice AA

    PO#5 Analyze the major theories of crime causation to include biological, sociological, psychological, and life course perspectives of criminality.

    Social Science AA

    PO# 4 Summarize the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, and historical trends in anthropology or sociology.
    PO#5 Assess the functionality of societies both present and past.

    Cross-listed: SOC 2400 Criminology

  
  •  

    CRMJ 2420 - Juvenile Justice


    This course provides an overview of the juvenile justice system and a working knowledge of criminal justice procedures by the police, courts, and corrections utilized in the handling of the juvenile offender.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
  
  •  

    CRMJ 2580 - Crisis Intervention


    This course explores the application of crisis theories in working with diverse populations. The role of the interventionist is examined.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
    Prerequisites:

    none



    Cross-listed: CNSL 2380 Crisis Intervention

  
  •  

    CRMJ 2590 - Drugs & Behavior


    This course provides an introduction and overview of the various substances the human body is exposed to and how we react to them.  Students analyze the interaction between drugs and human behaviors. Students predict the function of the major groups of legal and illicit substances and examine U.S. drug policy. Students also categorize the social effect of drugs on humans as well as evaluate drug activity and its use.

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisites:

    Complete PSYC 1000 General Psychology or SOC 1000 Sociological Principles, or instructor consent



    Cross-listed: PSYC 2210 - Drugs & Behavior
  
  •  

    CRMJ 2650 - Crime Prevention


    Introductory material, including historical information, is followed by sections on security requirements of various structures and identification and analysis of existing hazards. Electronic surveillance, retail security, armed robbery prevention, security lighting, safes, security surveys, and rape prevention are also covered.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
  
  •  

    CROP 0000 - Any course from the CROP department


    Choose any course from the CROP department.

  
  •  

    CROP 1150 - Pest Safety Application


    This course covers basic chemical principles. Students then apply them to an in-depth study of herbicides, insecticides and fertilizers. Students become familiar with the selection and application methods of various chemicals. Particular attention will be given to environmental concerns. Students who complete the course will be eligible to take the Wyoming Private Applicators examination. This qualifies them to purchase and use restricted use chemicals.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
    Prerequisites:

    None



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    CS 0000 - Cultural Studies


    The Cultural Studies requirement may be satisfied by completing classes designated as Global Studies, Foreign Language, Humanities, Social & Behavioral Science or Visual & Performing Arts.  Some programs restrict the categories from which students may choose, or designate the course to be used to fulfill the requirement.

    AA and AS degrees require 6 credits from 2 different areas. 
    AAS degree requires 3 credits. 
    AFA degree requires 9 credits. 
    ADN requires 4 credits.

     

  
  •  

    CS 0001 - Cultural Studies other than Social & Behavioral Sciences


    The Cultural Studies requirement may be satisfied by completing classes designated as Foreign Language, Global Studies, Humanities or Visual & Performing Arts.

    AA and AS degrees require 6 credits from 2 different areas. 

    AAS degree requires 3 credits. 

    AFA degree requires 9 credits. 

    ADN requires 4 credits.

  
  •  

    CSCO 2000 - Cisco: CCNA 1


    This course is the first of two courses designed to prepare students for a CCENT certification (Cisco Certified Entry Network Technician) which can lead to other Cisco certifications to include CCNA Routing and Switching and CCNA Security with additional coursework. The course focuses on networking fundamentals, terminology and protocols, local-area networks (LANs), wide-area networks (WANs), Open System Interconnection (OSI) models, cabling, cabling tools, switches and routers concepts and  basic programming, Ethernet, Internet Protocol (IP) addressing, and network standards. This course provides students with the skills required for network administration positions to install, operate, and troubleshoot small enterprise branch network, including basic network security. 

     

    Credits: 4

    Instructional Method Lecture/Lab

    General Education Requirement: None
    Prerequisites:
    Successful completion of MSFT 1745 A+ Computer Maintenance and MSFT 1510 Windows Client Operating System, or instructor approval.

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CSCO 2000 Cisco: CCNA I, the student will:

    1. explain physical components of a network.
    2. classify types of networks and topologies.
    3. interpret a network diagram.
    4. describe the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) standards, primary types and uses of twisted-pair cable, coaxial cable, fiber-optic cable, and wireless media.
    5. define components which connect LANs to the Internet
    6. demonstrate Cisco iOS command-line interface commands for device configuration.
    7. discuss the layers of the OSI and TCP/IP protocol model.
    8. describe data transfer in the network.
    9. configure Ethernet LAN switches.
    10. configure Ethernet LAN routers.
    11. describe IPv4 and IPv6 network addressing.
    12. implement network segmentation using subnetting.
    13. explain TCP and UDP communication.
    14. outline well known application layer protocols and services.
    15. describe a small network build process.
    16. describe common network security threats and vulnerabilities.
    17. implement attack mitigation and device security.


  
  •  

    CSCO 2020 - Cisco: CCNA 2


    This course is the second of two courses designed to prepare students for a CCENT certification (Cisco Certified Entry Network Technician) which can lead to other Cisco certifications to include CCNA Routing and Switching and CCNA Security with additional coursework. The course focuses on enhance switching technologies such as VLANS, VLAN trunking (VTP), Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP), small switch network configuration and troubleshooting, configure static routing and default routing and configure ACLs for IPv4. This course prepares the student with the skills required for network administration positions to install, operate, and troubleshoot small enterprise branch network, including basic network security. 

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture/Lab

    General Education Requirement: None
    Prerequisites:
    Successful completion of CSCO 2000 Cisco: CCNA 1

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CSCO 2020 Cisco: CCNA 2, the student will:

    1. describe converged networks.
    2. outline a switched network in a small – to medium-sized network.
    3. explain the process of frame forwarding in a switched network.
    4. configure a switch and router to support network and management requirements to include security best practice settings.
    5. troubleshoot basic switch problems.
    6. explain the purpose of VLANs in a switched network.
    7. configure VLANs, trunk ports, and inter-VLAN routing to include security best practice settings.
    8. explain primary functions and features of a router to include how a router builds a routing table.
    9. explain static routing including advantages and disadvantages.
    10. implement static routing via various methods.
    11. explain CIDR and VLSM.
    12. troubleshoot static and dynamic routing problems.
    13. explain dynamic routing protocols.
    14. configure dynamic routing via various methods.
    15. implement single-area Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing.
    16. explain how ACLs are used to filter traffic.
    17. create ACLs to accomplish various filtering goals.
    18. implement DHCP and NAT on a router.


  
  •  

    CSCO 2025 - Cisco: CCNA 3


    This course is the third of four courses designed to prepare students for a CCNA certification (Cisco Certified Network Technician) which can lead to other associate (CCNA) and professional level (CCNP) Cisco certifications with additional coursework. The course focuses on DHCP and DNS operations, Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) operations, VLAN link aggregation, router configuration in complex networks, OSPF and EIGRP routing protocols. This course provides students with the skills required for network administration positions to install, operate, and troubleshoot small- to medium-sized network

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture/Lab

    General Education Requirement: None
    Prerequisites:
    Successful completion of CSCO 2020 Cisco: CCNA 2

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CSCO 2025 Cisco: CCNA 3, the student will:

    1. describe a network design that is scalable.
    2. describe selection of appropriate switch and router devices to support network requirements.
    3. discuss issues with implementing a redundant network.
    4. explain common STP configurations such as HSRP and GLBP.
    5. explain link aggregation with EtherChannel.
    6. identify redundant link and aggregation issues.
    7. outline wireless LAN technology and topologies.
    8. describe wireless LAN technology security threats and mitigation techniques.
    9. outline advanced capabilities in a single-area OSPF.
    10. explain why multiarea OSPF is used.
    11. configure multiarea OSPF to meet network needs.
    12. describe the features of EIGRP.
    13. configure basic and advanced EIGRP for performance.
    14. identify advanced routing configuration problems.
    15. manage IOS Images and licensing.


  
  •  

    CSCO 2040 - Cisco: CCNA 4


    This course is the fourth of four courses designed to prepare students for a CCNA certification (Cisco Certified Network Technician) which can lead to other associate (CCNA) and professional level (CCNP) Cisco certifications with additional coursework. The course focuses on WAN technologies, VPNs and tunneling, serial connections, broadband connections, IPsec tunneling, monitor and troubleshooting network operations and network architecture. This course provides students with the skills required for network administration positions to install, operate, and troubleshoot small- to medium-sized WAN connected networks. 

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture/Lab

    General Education Requirement: None
    Prerequisites:
    Successful completion of CSCO 2025 Cisco: CCNA 3

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CSCO 2040 Cisco: CCNA 4, the student will:

    1. describe a structured network design to include the layers of a hierarchical network.
    2. explain the purpose of a WAN.
    3. compare various private and public WAN technologies.
    4. explain the fundamentals of point-to-point serial communications.
    5. show PPP WAN connectivity.
    6. describe the benefits of frame relay.
    7. describe basic frame relay configuration.
    8. explain static and dynamic NAT on an edge router.
    9. describe broadband solutions and criteria for selection to meet network needs.
    10. develop VPNs to include tunnels.
    11. compare IPsec and SSL remote access for VPNs.
    12. use appropriate monitoring and diagnostic tools to support operations and troubleshoot the network.


  
  •  

    CSEC 1500 - Computer Network Security+


    This course gives the student foundation-level computer and network security skills and knowledge. The course maps to the TestOut Security Pro and Comp TIA Security+ Certification and covers all core domains including systems security, network infrastructure, access control, assessments and audits, cryptography, and organizational security.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture/Lab

    Prerequisites:
    none

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CSEC 1500 Computer Network Security+, the student will:

    1. differentiate between various system security threats.
    2. apply industry best practices for identity and access control methods.
    3. differentiate general cryptography concepts.
    4. apply basic encryption concepts to appropriate applications.
    5. develop security policies and incident response processes.
    6. implement the appropriate network tools and procedures to facilitate network security.
    7. outline effective physical security risk mitigation practices.
    8. list network perimeter defense practices.
    9. detail common network attacks and methods of risk mitigation.
    10. state operating system hardening procedures to achieve workstation and server security.
    11. define application development secure coding lifecycle.
    12. explain applications vulnerabilities and appropriate countermeasures.
    13. describe data security issues and methods of protection.
    14. evaluate vulnerability assessments and audits using common industry tools.


  
  •  

    CSEC 1510 - Hardening Network Infrastructure


    This course gives students an awareness of security related issues and essential skills they will need as network administrators in order to provide a secure LAN, WLAN or WAN network. The course explores secure network infrastructure, understanding core security concepts, managing secure access, VPN encryption, firewalls, intrusion prevention, web and email content security, and endpoint security. This course helps prepare students for the Cisco CCNA Security 210-260 certification exam which can be attempted after the student has achieved CCENT or CCNA certification status.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture/Lab

    Prerequisites:
    Successful completion of CSCO 2000 Cisco: CCNA 1 and CSCO 2020 Cisco: CCNA 2, or hold an active CCENT or CCNA certification or instructor consent

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CSEC 1510 Hardening Network Infrastructure , the student will:

    1. explain network security concepts and common principles.
    2. identify common security threats.
    3. outline the fundamentals of Virtual Private Networks (VPN) technology and cryptography.
    4. describe the fundamentals of IP security.
    5. detail the process of implementing IPSEC Site-to-site VPNs.
    6. outline the process of implementing SSL Remote Access VPNs.
    7. describe mitigation techniques for email-based and web-based threats.
    8. describe firewall function, placement, benefits and limitations.
    9. outline the process of implementing a zone-based firewall on a router.
    10. describe the process of implementing basic firewall policies on an adaptive security appliance (ASA).
    11. discuss the deployment, basic configuration and performance tuning of an intrusion protection system (IPS).
    12. describe common threats to layer 2 technologies (switches) and associated mitigation techniques.
    13. explore the Network Foundation Protection framework.
    14. discuss security best practices associated with the device management plane.
    15. discuss security best practices associated with the IPV4 and IPv6 traffic in the data plane.
    16. examine the control plane and secure routing protocols.
    17. describe the methods available to secure local access.
    18. investigate Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) architecture, components and mobility device management.


  
  •  

    CSEC 1520 - Network Defense and Countermeasures


    This course is designed to prepare students to think like a hacker and further understand how attackers compromise networks. The course prepares students to conduct test attacks to discover vulnerabilities before attackers do. Students use Kali Linux, a security-testing application for hand-on activities. The goal of the course is to develop a structured approach to conducting a security test.  Additionally, students are introduced to the availability of professional certifications in this field.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture/Lab

    Prerequisites:
    Successful completion of COSC 2020 Linux Fundamentals and CSEC 1500 Computer Network Security +, or instructor consent.

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CSEC 1520 Network Defense and Countermeasures, the student will:

    1. describe the role of security and penetration testers.
    2. summarize what an ethical hacker can and cannot do legally.
    3. discuss types of attacks to computers, network and physical security.
    4. explain how foot-printing methods are used as part of an attacker’s reconnaissance phase.
    5. illustrate port scanning and ping sweeps.
    6. describe steps for enumerating operating systems such as Windows and Linux.
    7. outline programming concepts useful in network and computer security work.
    8. utilize shell scripting tips to automated security tasks.
    9. review vulnerabilities in Windows and Linux operating systems.
    10. evaluate best practices for hardening these systems.
    11. discuss vulnerabilities and best practices for protecting embedded operating systems.
    12. describe web applications vulnerabilities and the tools used to attack web servers.
    13. outline wireless networking hacking tools and countermeasures.
    14. describe attacks to crypto and other access protection systems.
    15. describe devices that can be employed to protect networks.
    16. identify laws affecting network security.


  
  •  

    CSEC 1530 - Computer Forensics


    This course is designed to train “digital investigators” to properly conduct a computer forensics examination and give them an understanding of the process of electronic discovery. Students learn the skills and techniques necessary to conduct a thorough examination. The course develops the foundation needed as the first step in the journey to achieve a Computer Forensics certification such as GIAC Certified Forensic Analyst (GCFA), ISFCE Certified Computer Examiner CCE or IACRB Certified Computer Forensics Examiner (CCFE).

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:
    Successful completion of CSEC 1500 Computer Network Security + and MSFT 1745 A+ Computer Maintenance, or instructor consent.

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CSEC 1530 Computer Forensics, the student will:

    1. discuss legal and ethical issues surrounding computer forensics.
    2. demonstrate an understanding of digital forensics fundamentals.
    3. assess evidence acquisition opportunities in common computer technology to include but not limited to: browsers, networks, computer systems, operating systems, email, and mobile devices.
    4. apply a forensically sound approach to evidence acquisition, preparation and preservation to various types of computer systems, file types, logs, communication, social media and common digital media employed throughout.
    5. determine data-hiding techniques.
    6. identify commonly used forensic software utilities and their purpose.
    7. identify commonly used forensic hardware tools and their purpose.
    8. detail the design of a digital forensics laboratory.
    9. discover the process of casework and report development.


  
  •  

    CULA 1500 - Food Principles


    This course takes a systems approach to sanitation, planning, preparation, and resource management. Cooking principles are thoroughly covered in safety, menu planning, equipment, purchasing, receiving, storing, and serving food. Students will learn how to tailor the guidelines of Food Principles #1 to fit the specific needs of any operation.

    Credits: 3

    Comments: $75 fee. Prior to Spring 2011, CULA 1500 was listed as Food Principles I

    Prerequisites:

     

    Completion of CULA 1100 Basic Culinary Skills with a C or better
    All CULA courses in the program must be completed with a C or better.



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    CULA 1510 - Sanitation


    This course utilizes Applied Food Service Sanitation, the industry leader in food safety training. The student learns the latest developments, procedures, current government standards and emerging issues in Food Service Sanitation. Students get a head start in understanding Hazardous Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP), a cutting-edge system that is the hospitality industry’s system-of-choice.

    Credits: 1

    General Education Requirement: None
    Prerequisites:

    All Culinary classes must be completed with a C or better to progress.



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    CULA 1515 - Basic Culinary Skills


    This course introduces the fundamental skills that are required to be a professional culinarian. Topics such as knife skills, stocks, sauces, soups as well as recipe conversion, costing and product identification are all covered in this course. These are the basic building blocks that are required for future culinary success.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture/Lab

    Prerequisites:
    None

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CULA 1515 Basic Culinary Skills, the student will:

    1. perform basic knife cuts within acceptable American Culinary Federation (ACF) guidelines.
    2. prepare stocks, soups and the five modern mother sauces.
    3. explore a variety of non-mother/classical sauces.
    4. characterize numerous common food products.
    5. explore the two basic soup categories.
    6. prepare a variety of soups from each basic category.
    7. determine the parts/components of a recipe
    8. describe a standardized recipe.
    9. outline the procedure for writing a standardized recipe


  
  •  

    CULA 1550 - Breakfast & Lunch Cookery


    This course takes a systems approach to sanitation, planning, preparation, and resource management. Cooking principles are thoroughly covered with respect to nutrition and preparation, purchasing, receiving, storing, and serving food. Students adapt the topics covered to fit the specific needs of any operation.

    Credits: 3

    Comments: $75 Fee

    Prerequisites:

     

    Completion of CULA 2700 Advanced Baking and Pastry with a C or better.

    All CULA courses in the program must be completed with a C or better.



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    CULA 1600 - Garde Manger


    This course takes a systems approach to the planning and preparation of cold foods as an alternative to other conventional types of food preparation. Cold kitchen principles are thoroughly covered in the sanitation, menu planning, purchasing, preparation, presentation, and storage of cold foods. Students learn how to tailor the guidelines of cold food preparation to fit the specific needs of any operation.

    Credits: 3

    Comments: $75 fee

    Prerequisites:

     

    Completion of CULA 1800 Meat Fabrication for Culinarian with a C or better

    All CULA courses in the program must be completed with a C or better.



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    CULA 1700 - Basic Baking


    This course takes a systems approach to the introduction, planning and preparation of baked goods. Beginning baking principles are introduced in the planning, purchasing, preparation, presentation, and proper storage of basic baked goods. Students learn how to tailor the guidelines of learned baking techniques to fit the specific needs of any operation.

    Credits: 3

    Comments: $75 Fee

    Prerequisites:

     

    Completion of CULA 1600 Garde Manger with a C or better

    All CULA courses in the program must be completed with a C or better.



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    CULA 1800 - Meat Fabrication for the Culinarian


    This course is structured to provide students with a hands-on, practical meat cutting experience. This course also deals with fabricated cuts ready for preparation. Students conduct meat identification and deal with whole carcasses and primal cuts. Students are introduced to meat-grading procedures, identification of meat quality, and become familiar with yield testing.

    Credits: 2

    Comments: $75 Fee

    Prerequisites:

     

    Completion of CULA 1500 Food Principles with a C or better

    All CULA courses in the program must be completed with a C or better.



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    CULA 2600 - Charcuterie


    This course takes a systems approach to the planning and preparation of sausages and other cold food preparation techniques as an alternative to other conventional types of food preparation. Cold kitchen principles are thoroughly covered for sanitation, menu planning, purchasing, preparation, presentation, and storage of cold foods. Students tailor the guidelines of cold food preparation to fit the specific needs of any operation.

    Credits: 3

    Comments: $75 Fee

    Prerequisites:

     

    Completion of CULA 1700 Charcuterie with a C or better

    All CULA courses in the program must be completed with a C or better.



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    CULA 2620 - Classical Italian Cuisine


    This course prepares students to be proficient in preparing classical Italian cuisine. Students explore the many different regions of Italy and prepare dishes from each region. Students also learn a competent knowledge base that enhances their career success in the culinary arts.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture/Lab

    Prerequisites:
    Students must maintain a culinary grade point average of 2.5 or better to progress to the next course.

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CULA 2620 Classical Italian Cuisine, the student will:

    1. Prepare numerous dishes from the many regions of Italy.
    2. Explore the various cooking styles and ingredients from several different regions.
    3. Discover about the historical significance of Italy and their influence on modern day cuisine.
    4. Discover the different styles of menu preparation.
    5. Prepare an Italian themed menu in a real world environment.


  
  •  

    CULA 2640 - International Cuisine


    This course takes a hands-on approach to the planning, development and creation of seven known food styles from around the world. Cooking principles are thoroughly covered including sanitation, ethnic ingredients, menu planning, cooking techniques and plate presentation. Cuisines that will be covered are Indian, Asian, Mexican, Italian, Mediterranean Spanish, and French.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture/Lab

    Prerequisites:
    Students must maintain a culinary grade point average of 2.5 or better to progress to the next course.

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CULA 2640 International Cuisine, the student will:

    1. Prepare numerous dishes from the many regions of Italy.
    2. Explore the various cooking styles and ingredients from several different regions.
    3. Discover about the historical significance of Italy and their influence on modern day cuisine.
    4. Discover the different styles of menu preparation.
    5. Prepare an Italian themed menu in a real world environment.


  
  •  

    CULA 2700 - Advanced Baking & Pastry


     

    This course provides an extensive, hands-on approach to the planning and preparation of advanced baked goods. Advanced baking principles are applied in the planning, purchasing, preparation, presentation, and proper storage of baked goods. Students tailor the guidelines of baking techniques to fit the specific needs of any operation.

    Credits: 3

    Comments: $75 Fee

    Prerequisites:

     

    Completion of CULA 2600 Charcuterie with a C or better

    All CULA courses in the program must be completed with a C or better.



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    CULA 2720 - North American Cuisine


    This course takes a hands-on approach to the planning, development and the creation of popular food styles from North America. Cooking principles and practices are thoroughly covered including sanitation, preparation, ingredient identification, menu planning, cooking techniques and plate presentation.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture/Lab

    Prerequisites:
    Students must maintain a culinary grade point average of 2.5 or better to progress to the next course.

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of CULA 2720 North American Cuisine, the student will:

    1. Prepare numerous dishes from the many regions of Italy.
    2. Explore the various cooking styles and ingredients from several different regions.
    3. Discover the historical significance of Italy and their influence on modern day cuisine.
    4. Discover the different styles of menu preparation.
    5. Prepare an Italian themed menu in a real world environment.


  
  •  

    CULA 2900 - Classical French Cuisine


    Classical French Cuisine is a hands-on approach to the study of the evolution of modern day cuisine.  This course covers cuisine of the various regions of France, emphasizing indigenous ingredients and preparation methods.  Students will become familiar with the gastronomy of Auguste Escoffier and his contributions to classical French cuisine.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: None
    Prerequisites:

    CULA 2200 International Cuisine with C or better, or instructor consent



  
  •  

    DESL 0000 - Any course from the DESL department


    Choose any course from the DESL department.

  
  •  

    DESL 1540 - Heavy Duty Electrical Systems


    This course introduces students to the basic theory of electricity and electronics. Students are instructed in the proper use of troubleshooting equipment and techniques. 

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites:

    None



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    DESL 1595 - Diesel Essentials


    This course introduces fundamental concepts for students studying the diesel industry. This course covers precision measuring tools, basic hand tools, basic shop equipment, specialty tools, hardware, and safety practices when using these tools and equipment.

    Credits: 2

    Prerequisites:

    None



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    DESL 1600 - Diesel Engines


     

    This course is intended for students planning a career in the diesel field. It is designed to provide instruction for the student in the theory and operation of diesel engines. Considerable time is spent on proper procedures to disassemble and assemble diesel engines. Component nomenclature, function, and analysis are covered, as is the proper usage of hand tools, measuring instruments, and equipment.

    Credits: 8

    General Education Requirement: None
    Comments: $120 Fee

    Prerequisites:

    None



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    DESL 1640 - Diesel Fuel Systems and Tuning


    This course will familiarize students with the air and fuel delivery systems, emission control devices and engine retarders that are currently used in the industry. Students will be instructed on the proper troubleshooting, repair and adjustment of the systems.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites:

    None



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    DESL 1670 - Heavy Equipment A/C Systems


    This course is intended for students planning a career in the Diesel Technology field. It is designed to provide instruction in the Heavy Equipment A/C systems used in today’s equipment. The theory and operation of systems are presented. Proper handling of refrigerants according to EPA regulations is covered and voluntary certification from the ASE is offered. Diagnosis and repair of systems is emphasized.

    Credits: 2

    General Education Requirement: None
    Comments: $30 Fee

    Prerequisites:

    None



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    DESL 1710 - Commercial Drivetrains I


    This course covers the theory and operation of heavy duty clutches and manual transmissions, as well as an introduction to planetary gear sets, torque converters and automatic transmissions. Proper installation procedures are covered in hands-on activities working with clutch replacement, manual transmission disassembly, assembly, and troubleshooting on both single and double countershaft transmissions.

    Credits: 3

    Comments: $45 Fee

    Prerequisites:

    None



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    DESL 1720 - Commercial Drivetrains II


    This course covers the theory of operation of drive shafts, heavy-duty axles, steering systems, air and hydraulic brakes, and suspension systems. Lab times consist of disassembly, assembly, and troubleshooting of the mentioned components.

    Credits: 3

    Comments: $45 Fee

    Prerequisites:

    None



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    DESL 1770 - Diesel Skills


    This course allows students, in a laboratory experience, to develop new skills and reinforce old ones. Students, with help from the instructor choose the area they wish to develop and work at their own pace. This course is intended, and its focus is, for students entering the mechanical field. 

    Credits: 1 to 2

    General Education Requirement: None
    Comments: This class is only for students in the Diesel Technology program.

    Prerequisites:

    None



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    DESL 1850 - Mobile Hydraulic Technology


    This course will cover the basic theories of hydraulics (pressure, flow, force, inertia, torque, and work are some of the hydraulic principals covered). Hydraulic components, graphic symbols, hydraulic oils and filtration will also be integrated into this course.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites:

    None



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    DESL 1870 - Mobile Hydraulic Troubleshooting


    This course introduces students to safe troubleshooting techniques using the leakage path analysis.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites:

    DESL 1850 - Mobile Hydraulic Technology



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    DESL 2010 - Diesel Electronics


    This course covers the operating principles of electronically controlled diesel engines and support systems. Theories of the major components used in these systems are covered. Proper troubleshooting skills, hardware, and software usage for each system are also covered.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites:

    ELTR 1540 - Heavy-Duty Electrical Systems



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    DESL 2710 - Drivetrains III


    This course is designed to provide instruction in the theory and operation of Heavy Duty Drivetrains. Considerable time is spent on proper procedures to disassemble and assemble torque converters, power shift, and automatic transmissions. The class will also work with common planetary final drives. Component nomenclature, function, and analysis are covered as is the proper usage of hand tools, measuring instruments and special equipment.

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisites:

    None



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    DHYG 1000 - Survey of Dental Hygiene


    This course provides a broad overview of the dental hygiene profession.  Concepts addressed include history of the discipline, scope of practice, ethics, professionalism, dental terminology, basic dental anatomy, duties and responsibilities, evidence-based decision making, communication within a diverse culture, and career options.

    Credits: 1

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:

    none



    Co-requisites:

    none



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 1000 Survey of Dental Hygiene, the student will:

     

    1. explain the dental hygiene process of care model.
    2. identify basic oral anatomical features and terminology.
    3. analyze communication methods for diverse clients across the lifespan.
    4. apply evidenced-based, ethical, and legal principles to problem-based case scenarios.
    5. differentiate between career options.
    6. describe duties and responsibilities of a licensed dental hygienist.


  
  •  

    DHYG 2100 - Dental Health Education


    This course is designed to assist dental hygiene students in addressing methods for preventing oral disease, behavior modification techniques, and patient education.  This course prepares students to apply preventive oral health concepts and individualize oral health care in clinical dental hygiene and community health environments.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Comments: Prior to Fall 2010, DHYG 2100 was listed as DHYG 3100

    Prerequisites:

    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required



    Co-requisites:

    none



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 2100 Dental Health Education, the student will:

    1. explain the oral disease processes.
    2. promote positive values of overall health and wellness to the public.
    3. communicate in a culturally sensitive manner with diverse individuals.
    4. assess the dental/oral health education needs of patients.
    5. identify obstacles to achieving optimal oral health.
    6. evaluate factors that can be used to promote patient adherence to disease prevention or health maintenance strategies.
    7. conduct an oral health risk assessment.
    8. integrate accepted current scientific theories and research into educational and preventive over-the-counter oral self-care products.
    9. integrate accepted current scientific theories and research related to  the preventive modalities of fluorides, sealants, and adjunctive therapies.
    10. differentiate between behavioral modification theories.
    11. develop individualized patient oral health education plans based on case    scenarios.
    12. conduct a dietary analysis with a patient.
    13. recommend appropriate oral physiotherapy aids based on a patient’s individualized dental hygiene care plan.
    14. implement a caries risk behavioral change plan with a patient.
    15. evaluate the effectiveness of behavioral change plans.
    16. explore the effectiveness of various tobacco cessation programs.
    17. apply the principles of tobacco cessation counseling.


  
  •  

    DHYG 2200 - Pharmacology


    This course familiarizes students with the sources, actions, uses, dosages and toxic effects of drugs.  It covers drugs commonly used in dentistry and drugs commonly taken by patients that affect dental and dental hygiene therapy.

    Credits: 2

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:

    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required.



    Co-requisites:

    none



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 2200 Pharmacology, the student will:

    1. Apply vocabulary and terminology associated with pharmacology to read and interpret new information.
    2. Utilize appropriate reference material.
    3. Describe the indications, pharmacokinetics, pharmacological effects, adverse reactions, drug interactions, and dosages associated with the various drug groups.
    4. Discuss the drugs/ drug categories used in dentistry and the side effects.
    5. Discuss possible oral complications associated with drug therapy and systemic disease.


  
  •  

    DHYG 2210 - Dental Embryology and Histology


    This course involves the study of the development and histologic structure of elements in the head and neck region. Special emphasis will be placed on embryology of structures in the orofacial region.  Histologic features will be related to functional characteristics of the tissues discussed.

    Credits: 2

    Prerequisites:

    Sequence of course work is established by the Dental Hygiene Program.



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    DHYG 2300 - Preclinical Dental Hygiene


    This course prepares students for clinical dental hygiene experience.  Topics include aseptic techniques, assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of individualized dental hygiene care.

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisites:

    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required.



  
  •  

    DHYG 2305 - Clinical Dental Technology


    This course prepares the dental hygiene student to utilize the dental computer program Eagle Soft required in the Sheridan College Dental Hygiene Clinic. Competence in this technology equips graduates to move on to operate similar dental software used by various dental practices.
     

    Credits: 1

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Co-requisites:
    DHYG 2470 Orientation to Dental Hygiene, DHYG 2300 Pre-clinical Dental Hygiene

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DYHG 2305 Clinical Dental Technology , the student will:

    1. Obtain electronic signatures for legal documents explaining HIPAA and clinical protocols for clients.
    2. Develop client records including personal contact information and preferred providers.
    3. Explain importance of accurate, complete client assessment and records.
    4. Create additional required clinical documents using the tool SmartDocs within Eagle Soft.
    5. Enter proposed dental hygiene services using Code on Dental Procedures and Nomenclature coding.
    6. Validate quality assurance of comprehensive dental care completion with chart audit documentation.


  
  •  

    DHYG 2350 - Clinical Dental Hygiene I


    This course allows dental hygiene students to apply practical skills in patient care and education during supervised clinical experience.

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisites:

    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required.



  
  •  

    DHYG 2400 - Head, Neck, and Oral Anatomy/Physiology


    This course focuses on the structure and function of the head and neck of the human body, including the nomenclature of bones, muscles, blood vessels, nerves, glands, lymphatic structure, fasciae, and spaces.  Emphasis is placed on structures associated with the mouth and the masticatory system and their clinical application to the dental hygiene process of care.   

    Credits: 2

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:

    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required.



    Co-requisites:

    none



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 2400 Head, Neck, and Oral Anatomy and Physiology, the student will:

    1. Locate on diagrams and models of the head and neck all of the major components of the skeletal, muscular, glandular, nervous, vascular, and lymphatic systems and describe their physiological importance to the practice of dental hygiene.
    2. Recognize the relationship of the oral cavity and head and neck region to the rest of the body.
    3. Identify all intra-and extra-oral landmarks associated with the major anatomical structures in the head and neck region.
    4. Describe the paranasal sinuses, their drainage, relationship to structures in the oral cavity and spread of dental infection in the head and neck.
    5. Describe functions of masticatory and facial expression musculature.
    6. Relate this anatomy to the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction.
    7. Identify lymphatic drainage from the head and neck and relate it to the spread of infection and metastasis.
    8. Describe the major fascial spaces and compartments and relate them to the spread of infection in the head and neck.
    9. Distinguish between veins and arteries and their functions.
    10. Recognize nerves of the head and neck region and their paths of innervation.
    11. Identify landmarks for local anesthesia on a human skull.


  
  •  

    DHYG 2405 - Dental Anatomy


    This course involves the study of basic dental terminology, tooth form, function occlusion, notation systems, tooth morphology, eruption and exfoliation patterns. Course activities include examination of natural teeth, teeth models and skulls.

    Credits: 2

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:
    Sequence of course work is established by the Dental Hygiene Program.

    Co-requisites:
    None

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 2405 Dental Anatomy, the student will:

    1. Locate and describe the basic structures of the oral cavity.
    2. Apply correct dental terminology to describe the location and morphologic characteristics of each tooth in the primary and permanent dentition.
    3. Differentiate between tooth numbering systems and apply the Universal numbering system to clinical and radiographic situations.
    4. Analyze a tooth’s function based on its morphology.
    5. Identify extracted teeth by name and Universal number.
    6. Predict dental hygiene instrumentation challenges based on root morphology.
    7. Predict patient homecare challenges and susceptibility to dental disease based on tooth morphology.
    8. Determine the eruption, exfoliation, and root completion dates for the primary and permanent dentition.
    9. Evaluate the occlusion of models/case studies/peers/patients and differentiate between the primary/mixed/permanent dentition.


  
  •  

    DHYG 2420 - Clinical Seminar I


    This course provides continued preparation for clinical experience through instruction in the interpretation of client assessment data, and designing dental hygiene care for clients across the lifespan and those who are medically compromised.

    Credits: 2

    Prerequisites:

    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required.



  
  •  

    DHYG 2450 - Oral Radiology


    This is a lecture course dealing with the principles of x-ray production, exposure, processing, and radiation biology. Also covered are analysis and interpretation of dental radio graphic images.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:
    Sequence of coursework is established by the dental hygiene program.

    Co-requisites:
    DHYG 2451, Oral Radiology Lab, 1 credit

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 2450 , the student will:

    1. Describe the principles of radiation and x-radiation.
    2. Identify the component parts and workings of the dental x-ray machine.
    3. Describe factors affecting the quality of the x-ray beam and the resulting radiographic image.
    4. Explain the effects of ionizing radiation on living tissues.
    5. Discuss radiation biology health and safety.
    6. Demonstrate selection of appropriate radiographic surveys, sensor size      and sensor use.
    7. Demonstrate currently accepted intraoral techniques for bitewing images (horizontal and vertical), occlusal images and periapical images, with an emphasis on paralleling technique.  
    8. Evaluate and demonstrate supplementary techniques for specialized patient conditions. (endodontic, localization, edentulous, pediatric patients,  difficult anatomy, disabling conditions)
    9. Explain the techniques of proper sensor/film processing, handling and record keeping.
    10. Explain image viewing techniques and principles of interpretation
    11. Recognize and name the radiographic errors and artifacts on intra oral and extra oral images.
    12. Interpret and describe normal anatomy versus pathology on radiographic images.
    13. Identify and describe classifications of dental caries and restorative materials viewed on radiographs.
    14. Classify periodontal disease according to radiographic bone levels.
    15. Explain appropriate infection control protocols for radiography.
    16. Describe and implement quality assurance procedures.


    Program Outcomes
    Dental Hygiene AAS

    PO#1 Apply a professional code of ethics in all endeavors, assuming responsibility for professional actions.

    PO#4 Provide individualized care utilizing the dental hygiene process of care model (assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation, documentation) that includes the educational, preventive, and therapeutic services necessary to achieve and maintain oral health

  
  •  

    DHYG 2451 - Oral Radiology Lab


    This is a laboratory course dealing with the principles of x-ray production, exposure, processing, and radiation biology.  Techniques for achieving diagnostic radiographs will be taught.  Also covered are analysis and interpretation of dental radiographic images.

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisites:

    Sequence of coursework is established by the Dental Hygiene program.



    Co-requisites:

    DHYG 2450, Oral Radiology, 3 credits



  
  •  

    DHYG 2455 - Dental Materials


    This course covers the lecture portion of the scientific and application principles of dental materials. It includes study of the composition, properties and other factors which provide scientific rationale in the selection and use of materials employed in the fabrication of dental appliances and tooth restorations.

    Credits: 2

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Comments: This course was previously numbered DHYG 2460.

    Co-requisites:
    DHYG 2456 Dental Materials 2456

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 2455 Dental Materials, the student will:

    1. Identify physical, chemical, and biological properties of specific dental materials.
    2. Apply principles and techniques when proportioning and manipulating all dental materials that are within the dental hygienist’s scope of practice.
    3. Evaluate variables in manipulation of dental materials that may influence desired outcomes, including initiating or implementing procedures to eliminate errors during manipulation of dental materials.
    4. Apply principles of professional and ethical behavior.


  
  •  

    DHYG 2456 - Dental Materials Lab


    This course covers the laboratory portion of the scientific and application principles of dental materials. It includes study of the composition, properties and other factors which provide scientific rationale in the selection and use of materials employed in the fabrication of dental appliances and tooth restorations.

    Credits: 1

    Instructional Method Lab

    Co-requisites:
    DHYG 2455 Dental Materials

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 2456 Dental Materials Lab, the student will:

    1. Identify physical, chemical, and biological properties of specific dental materials.
    2. Apply principles and techniques when proportioning and manipulating all dental materials that are within the dental hygienist’s scope of practice.
    3. Evaluate variables in manipulation of dental materials that may influence desired outcomes, including initiating or implementing procedures to eliminate errors during manipulation of dental materials.
    4. Apply principles of professional and ethical behavior.


  
  •  

    DHYG 2460 - Dental Materials


    This course covers the lecture portion of the scientific and application principles of dental materials. It includes study of the composition, properties and other factors which provide scientific rationale in the selection and use of materials employed in the fabrication of dental appliances and tooth restorations.

    Credits: 2

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:
    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required.

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 2460 Dental Materials, the student will:

    1. Identify physical, chemical, and biological properties of specific dental materials.
    2. Apply principles and techniques when proportioning and manipulating all dental materials that are within the dental hygienist’s scope of practice.
    3. Evaluate variables in manipulation of dental materials that may influence desired outcomes, including initiating or implementing procedures to eliminate errors during manipulation of dental materials.
    4. Apply principles of professional and ethical behavior.


  
  •  

    DHYG 2461 - Dental Materials Lab


    This course covers the laboratory portion of the scientific and application principles of dental materials. It includes study of the composition, properties and other factors which provide scientific rationale in the selection and use of materials employed in the fabrication of dental appliances and tooth restorations.

    Credits: 1

    Instructional Method Lab

    Co-requisites:
    DHYG 2460 Dental Materials

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 2461 Dental Materials Lab, the student will:

    1. Identify physical, chemical, and biological properties of specific dental materials.
    2. Apply principles and techniques when proportioning and manipulating all dental materials that are within the dental hygienist’s scope of practice.
    3. Evaluate variables in manipulation of dental materials that may influence desired outcomes, including initiating or implementing procedures to eliminate errors during manipulation of dental materials.
    4. Apply principles of professional and ethical behavior.


  
  •  

    DHYG 2470 - Orientation to Dental Hygiene


    This course prepares the student dental hygienist for clinical experience with a comprehensive overview of the principles, concepts, and techniques related to the dental hygiene process of care.

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisites:

    Sequence of course work is established by the Dental Hygiene Program.



    Co-requisites:

    None



  
  •  

    DHYG 3100 - Dental Health Education


    This course studies methods for preventing oral disease, including nutritional and dietary counseling, patient education, and behavior modification techniques.  It prepares students to apply preventive dentistry concepts in clinical dental hygiene courses and community dental health.

    Credits: 2

    Prerequisites:

    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required.



  
  •  

    DHYG 3230 - Clinical Seminar II


    This course is a continuation of the Clinical Seminar Series.  Course content will focus on the review and enhancement of instrumentation skills; the essentials of instrument selection; the role of root planing in dental hygiene; the development and refinement of skills needed for treatment of more advanced periodontal cases, which includes the initiation of a periodontal case study; and the introduction and preparation for the use of state-of-the-art clinical technologies.

    Credits: 2

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 3230 Clinic Seminar II , the student will:

    1. Correlate didactic material with clinical applications in patient care.
    2. Apply instrumentation techniques learned in previous clinical courses as well as new techniques used for advanced instrumentation.
    3. Produce intra-oral and digital camera images of diagnostic quality.
    4. Create treatment plan adaptations for patients who are challenged with mental disorders.
    5. Demonstrate ultrasonic and sonic scaler debridement techniques.
    6. Demonstrate the use of an air-powder polisher.
    7. Explore the different types of adjunct therapies available for treating advanced periodontal conditions.
    8. Demonstrate the application of minocycline gel.
    9. Compare the concepts of root planing and periodontal debridement.
    10. Develop competency in synthesizing advanced periodontal patient care through the review of case studies.
    11. Explore the use of dental endoscopy and laser therapy for periodontal procedures.
    12. Demonstrate screening techniques for HIV testing.


  
  •  

    DHYG 3250 - Clinical Seminar III


     This course prepares the dental hygiene student to make the transition froman educational setting to private practice. Focus is on applying, synthesizing, and transferring clinical and didactic knowledge to clinical and ethical decision-making. Students will be engaged in problem-based case studies, application of behavioral change theories/models, development of a risk management plan, and analysis of evidence-based research.

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    DHYG 3300 - Clinical Dental Hygiene II


    This course provides students the opportunity to gain further practical experience in dental hygiene procedures by providing comprehensive patient care in clinical settings.  A flexible format allows students to meet requirements in procedures for patient record-keeping, patient education, dental prophylaxis, dental radiography and routine clinical procedures.

    Credits: 5

  
  •  

    DHYG 3350 - Clinical Dental Hygiene III


    This course assists students in gaining practical experience in clinical procedures requiring greater skill and knowledge than procedures previously undertaken.  This course prepares students for the transition to private office practice.

    Credits: 5

    Instructional Method Clinical

    Prerequisites:

    Complete DHYG 3300 - Dental Hygiene II



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 3350 Clinic Dental Hygiene III, the student will:

    1. Assume responsibility for dental hygiene actions and services, according to clinic protocol.
    2. Provide documentation for assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of dental hygiene services.
    3. Communicate using positive verbal and nonverbal communication skills with all individuals.
    4. Communicate professional knowledge orally and in writing.
    5. Teach clients to value the delivery of competent care by dental professionals.
    6. Integrate the professional code of ethics in all endeavors.
    7. Adhere to state and federal laws, recommendations, and regulations in the provision of dental hygiene care.
    8. Provide care to all clients using an individualized approach that is empathetic and caring.
    9. Serve all clients and the community without discrimination, appreciating the cultural differences of the population.
    10. Ensure the privacy of the client during dental hygiene treatment and counseling and the confidentiality of client records.
    11. Accept responsibility for solving problems and making decisions based on accepted scientific principles.
    12. Utilize sound judgment in application of new information to client/client care
    13. Analyze collected data on the general, oral, and psycho-social health status of clients with methods consistent with the dental hygiene scope of practice and legal principles.
    14. Formulate a comprehensive dental hygiene care plan in collaboration with the client and other health professionals.
    15. Provide preventive and therapeutic services that promote oral health according to the needs of the client.
    16. Evaluate the effectiveness of implemented clinical, preventive, and educational services and modify as needed.
    17. Respect the values and beliefs of the client while promoting optimal oral and general health.
    18. Recognize and refer clients who may have physiologic, psychological, and/or social problems for comprehensive client evaluation.
    19. Identify factors that can be used to motivate the client for disease prevention and/or health maintenance.
    20. Accept responsibility for self-assessment and professional growth through life-long learning.


  
  •  

    DHYG 3400 - General and Oral Pathology


    This course is designed to teach students the concepts underlying general and oral manifestations of human disease states, manifestations of specific diseases, relationships to body defense mechanisms, and potential implications for medical and dental hygiene treatment. To the extent possible, applications to clinical situations in dental hygiene practice will be made.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:

    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 3400 General and Oral Pathology, the student will:

    1. Explain the ways general and oral pathology impact dental hygiene practice.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to understand, pronounce, spell, and use correctly the terminology unique to the study of pathology.
    3. Summarize the systemic and oral conditions seen in a clear and concise presentation to a clinical instructor, the patient’s dentist or other health care professional.
    4. Formulate a differential diagnosis.
    5. Differentiate between variants of normal and pathological oral conditions.
    6. Discuss injury, inflammation and wound repair as they apply to oral mucosa, salivary glands, dental pulp, and bones of the jaw.
    7. Recognize traumatic injuries to the head and neck region, oral cavity and dentition.
    8. Recognize oral and systemic manifestations of infectious disease.
    9. Describe the mechanism of body defense and explain the role played by the immune system.
    10. Discuss hypersensitivity and autoimmunity as they relate to disorders of the head, neck and oral regions.
    11. Explain the origin of common developmental disorders of the head, neck and oral regions encountered in dental patients.
    12. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of genetics and environmental factors on the etiology of disease.
    13. Demonstrate an understanding of the processes involved in initiation and spread of malignant neoplasms.
    14. Explain the epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations, prognosis, and management of oral cancer in the United States.
    15. Correlate the signs and symptoms of oral pathology conditions with the etiologic factors.
    16. Discuss oral manifestations of systemic disease.


  
  •  

    DHYG 3550 - Community Dental Health


    This course provides the dental hygiene student with an introduction to basic skills needed to evaluate the dental health community, including research methodology and basic statistical analysis.  It provides the student with a basic understanding of the significant social, political, psychological and economic factors influencing the American Health System.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture and Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required.



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 3550 Community Dental Health, the student will:

    1. Identify roles of the dental professional within a community.
    2. Explore characteristics of the current dental care delivery system.
    3. Examine the social, political, cultural and economic factors that affect utilization of the dental care delivery system.
    4. Generalize issues that may affect the current health care system and compare these to the Surgeon General’s Report on Oral Health Care.
    5. Relate the concept of community-based needs to the following subject areas:  Oral Epidemiology; Dental Health Education ; Health Promotion Strategies; Prevention, Control and Treatment of Oral Diseases.
    6. Compare the cost-effectiveness of preventive measures when applied to community-based dental programs.
    7. Analyze and group assessment data to address the needs of a target population group.
    8. Demonstrate the process of planning, implementing and evaluating a community-based program.
    9. Compute basic biostatistics.


  
  •  

    DHYG 3600 - Ethics and Law in Dental Hygiene


    This course provides an introduction to basic concepts in the analysis of ethical theories, principles, values, the professional code of ethics, and legal aspects associated with the dental hygiene healthcare profession. Contemporary issues are examined in dentistry and medicine as a strategy to explore and apply ethical principles in diverse cultures and situations.

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    DHYG 3720 - Office Practice


    This course teaches the scientific and application principles of dental materials.  The didactic portion of Dental Materials is a study of the composition, properties and other factors which provide the scientific rationale in the selection and use of materials that are employed in the fabrication of dental appliances and tooth restorations.

    Credits: 2

    Prerequisites:

    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required.



  
  •  

    DHYG 3750 - Periodontology


    This course reviews the anatomy and histology of periodontal structures and dental accretions followed by a study of the classifications and etiology of periodontal diseases including both local and systemic factors.  A thorough exploration of the hygienist’s role in disease recognition, prevention, therapeutic procedures and maintenance is also included.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:

    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required.



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 3750 Periodontology, the student will:

    1. Identify the clinical, histological and radiographic features of periodontal health versus periodontal diseases.
    2. Compare the various stages of severity of periodontal diseases.
    3. Describe the function of the periodontium.
    4. Classify patient level of periodontal severity according to the American Academy of Periodontology Classification System.
    5. Describe local and systemic factors involved in the etiology and pathogenesis of periodontal disease.
    6. Develop an individualized patient treatment plan to include patient periodontal classification, treatment needs, oral hygiene care needs, proposed prognosis and appropriate patient recare.
    7. Review non-surgical periodontal therapy.
    8. Explore the most commonly performed periodontal surgical procedures and discuss the prognosis of each.
    9. Determine individualized steps to be taken at a patient periodontal re-evaluation appointment.
    10. Modify maintenance programs which are designed to meet individual patient needs.


  
  •  

    DHYG 3770 - Pain Management


    This course provides clinical experience with local anesthesia and inhalation sedation techniques. It includes the detection of anatomic landmarks in the mouth pertaining to specific injection sites, preparation of the armamentarium, maintenance of asepsis, simulated and real injection of anesthetic agents at predetermined sites and administration of nitrous oxide/oxygen.

    Credits: 2

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:
    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required.

    Co-requisites:
    DHYG 3775 Pain Management Lab

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 3770 Pain Management, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate complete understanding of the head and neck structures involved in the delivery of local anesthetic to include bones, muscles, nerves, and vascular supply.
    2. Apply Oraqix in a safe and effective manner to appropriate patients.
    3. Explain the components and assemble the armamentarium for local anesthetic injections.
    4. Explain the basic injection techniques common to all intraoral local anesthetic injections.
    5. Demonstrate safe and effective techniques for all intraoral local anesthetic injections.
    6. Explain the physiologic process of pain conduction and blockage.
    7. Explain the psychological components of pain.
    8. Select the most appropriate topical anesthetic, local anesthetic and/or inhalation agent based on patient assessment.
    9. Determine emergency management procedures appropriate for complications which could arise from local anesthetic injections and inhalation sedation.
    10. Write accurate and complete patient records.
    11. Administer nitrous oxide/oxygen sedation safely and effectively after patient assessment.


    Program Outcomes
    Dental Hygiene AAS

    PO#1 Apply a professional code of ethics in all endeavors, assuming responsibility for professional actions.

    PO#2 Promote positive values of overall health and wellness, in a culturally competent manner, to individuals, the public, and organizations within and outside the profession.

    PO#4 Provide individualized care utilizing the dental hygiene process of care model (assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation, documentation) that includes the educational, preventive, and therapeutic services necessary to achieve and maintain oral health.

    PO#5 Accept responsibility for continuous professional growth through self-assessment, pursuit of life-long learning, and service activities.

  
  •  

    DHYG 3775 - Pain Management Lab


    This course provides clinical experience with local anesthesia and inhalation sedation techniques. It includes the detection of anatomic landmarks in the mouth pertaining to specific injection sites, preparation of the armamentarium, maintenance of asepsis, simulated and real injection of anesthetic agents at predetermined sites and administration of nitrous oxide/oxygen.

    Credits: 1

    Instructional Method Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required.



    Co-requisites:

    DHYG 3770 - Pain Management (lecture)



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of DHYG 3775 Pain Management Lab, the student will:

    1. Assemble all component parts of the equipment required for injections.
    2. Maintain the chain of asepsis throughout the local anesthetic/inhalation process.
    3. Administer local anesthetic agents safely with the least amount of pain and trauma to the patient.
    4. Demonstrate patient management skills which will alleviate patients’ fears of the injection procedure.
    5. Demonstrate correct assembly of the nitrous oxide/oxygen sedation equipment.
    6. Administer nitrous oxide/oxygen to a lab partner in a safe and effective manner.
    7. Write accurate and complete patient records.


  
  •  

    DHYG 3800 - Board Review


    This course is designed to assist dental hygiene students in preparing for the National Board Dental Hygiene Exam, the western and central regional clinical and anesthesia board exams, and state jurisprudence exams. These exams are required for licensure to practice dental hygiene in the United States.  This course includes discussion of the distinction between various agencies in the education, healthcare and legal system which have jurisdiction over the licensure process, and the impact of cheating during any portion of the process on the public welfare.

    Credits: 1

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:

    Admission to the Dental Hygiene program required.



  
  •  

    DVST 0960 - Beginning Computer Skills


    This class is designed to be a first class for the novice computer user. The class is workbook oriented with emphasis towards a hands-on learning of the primary applications covering word processing, spreadsheets, and databases. Throughout the course, the student will become familiar with the keyboard, handling diskettes, and other basic computer concepts.

    Credits: 2

    General Education Requirement: None
  
  •  

    ECON 0000 - Any course from the ECON department


    Choose any course from the ECON department

  
  •  

    ECON 1010 - Macroeconomics


    This course is an introductory course covering a variety of macroeconomic concepts. It focuses on national income accounting, aggregate demand and supply, unemployment, inflation, fiscal policy, monetary policy, Keynesian and supply-side views, international trade and economic growth.  Applications are drawn primarily from the United States economy.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture

    General Education Requirement: Social and Behavioral Sciences
    Comments: This course also satisfies the Human Culture requirement at UW.

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of ECON 1010 Macroeconomics, the student will:

    1. Evaluate the terms, concepts, and points of view used in basic economic inquiry.
    2. Assess the role of government performance in a mixed economic system.
    3.   Compare basic measurements of economic performance.
    4. Evaluate the circular flow model and explain its relationship with economic growth, unemployment and inflation.
    5.   Assess the Keynesian and Classical model in terms of the production function and the related effects.
    6.   Describe money and its creation.
    7. Analyze the tools of the central bank and the monetary policy mechanism.
    8. Evaluate the changing international role of the United States as a debtor nation.
    9. Evaluate usage of exchange rates, comparative advantage, and trade policy tools.


    Program Outcomes
    Business AS

    PO#5 Analyze the basic features of domestic and international economic systems.

  
  •  

    ECON 1020 - Microeconomics


    This course is an introductory course covering a variety of economic concepts. It focuses on model building, production possibilities, scarcity and choices, opportunity costs and trade-offs, the market system, supply and demand, resource allocation in the market, government intervention and its consequences, elasticity, cost, market model (pure competition), monopoly, oligopoly, and monopolistic competition.  It explores economic issues including market power, labor, positive and negative externalities and public choice.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture

    General Education Requirement: Social and Behavioral Sciences
    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of ECON 1020 Microeconomics , the student will be able to:

    1. Examine the terms, concepts, and points of view used in basic economic inquiry.
    2. Assess the nature and function of the product market.
    3. Analyze consumer demand using elasticity and utility.
    4. Examine the firm’s production, cost and revenue.
    5. Assess profit maximization under perfect competition, or imperfect competition.
    6. Evaluate the uniquely American experiment in legislative control of monopoly with antitrust policy.
    7. Analyze market failures and the rate of government intervention with externalities and public goods.
    8. Explain the changing international role of the United States as a debtor nation.
    9. Evaluate the usage of exchange rates, comparative advantage, and trade policy tools.


    Program Outcomes
    Business AS

    PO#5 Analyze the basic features of domestic and international economic systems.

  
  •  

    ECON 2400 - Economics of the Environment


    This course serves as an introduction to the economics of the environment, with an emphasis on examining environmental management and policy from an economic perspective. The course explores general resource and environmental issues and problems, such as those involving energy, water, agricultural, biodiversity, fisheries and pollution as well as current global concerns such as population growth global climate change and sustainable development.

    Students are introduced to the framework used by economists to evaluate the relationship between the economy and the natural environment. Economic tools will be developed that provide a means of valuing natural resources. These tools provide students with the ability to evaluate alternatives for achieving a socially optimum resource allocation and usage that ensures sustainable economic growth.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Requirement: Meets Global Diversity Requirement
    Prerequisites:

    ECON 1020 - Micro Economics with a “C” or better



  
  •  

    EDCI 0000 - Science & Seminar


    CHEM 1090 Fundamentals of the Physical Universe and EDCI 1440 Physical Science in Elementary Schools;

    GEOL 1070 The Earth:Its Physical Environment and EDCI 1450 Earth Science in Elementary Schools; or

    BIOL 1020 Life Science and EDCI 1430 Life Science in Elementary Schools

     

  
  •  

    EDCI 1005 - Effective Substitute Teaching


    This course provides students with an understanding of professional ethics and responsibilities. The students expand their awareness of classroom management techniques, increase knowledge of effective teaching behaviors and develop a teaching resource file.

    Credits: 2

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:

    none



    Co-requisites:

    none



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of EDCI 1005 Effective Substitute Teaching, the student will:

    1. Generate solutions for situation that may occur during substitute teaching experiences.
    2. Integrate discipline strategies, instructional techniques and classroom management skills.
    3. Discuss legal and moral issues in the classroom.
    4. Outline professional responses to legal and moral issues.
    5. Assess certified teachers.
    6. Investigate the certification application process.


  
  •  

    EDCI 1430 - Life Science Seminar


    This course is designed for students majoring in elementary education or early childhood education and is a companion course to BIOL 1020 Life Science.  The course focuses on teaching strategies, materials, and activities appropriate for the elementary school setting that are related to the materials and content encountered in BIOL 1020 Life Science. Students also develop an effective pedagogy for use in classrooms.

    Credits: 1

    Instructional Method Lecture/Lab

    General Education Requirement: None
    Prerequisites:
    Grade of C or better in ENGL 1010 English I and EDFD 2020 Foundations of Education

    Co-requisites:
    BIOL 1020 - Life Science

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of EDCI 1430: Life Science Seminar, the student will:

    1. Make connections between the content in BIOL 1020 LIfe Science and actually teaching the life science topics in the elementary school.
    2. Utilize materials and activities appropriate for elementary school students’ conceptual level of development that are related to materials/content encountered in BIOL 1020 Life Science.
    3. Demonstrate teaching strategies appropriate for elementary school students’ conceptual level of development that are related to materials/content encountered in BIOl 1020 Life Science.
    4. Acquire positive attitudes toward teaching children about life science and its relevance to the learner’s life.


    Program Outcomes
    Upon completion of EDCI 1430 Life Science Seminar, the student will:

    Elementary Education

    PO#2 Construct learning experiences based on current best practices, developmental theories, and state and national standards.

    PO#3 Use effective, appropriate, and varied instructional methods to communicate with diverse audiences.

    PO#4 Evaluate instructional methods that connect learning with the students’ diverse experiences and needs.

    PO#5 Implement self-reflection strategies to enhance professional and personal growth.

  
  •  

    EDCI 1440 - Physical Science in the Elementary School


    This course is designed for students majoring in elementary education or early childhood education and is a companion course to CHEM 1090 Fundamentals of the Physical Universe.  Students effectively use problem- solving techniques to solve a variety of physical situations. Students recognize a variety of uses of physics/chemistry/astronomy in everyday life, and develop an effective pedagogy for use in classrooms.

    Credits: 1

    Instructional Method Lecture/Lab

    Prerequisites:
    Grade of C or better in ENGL 1010 English I and EDFD 2020 Foundations of Education

    Co-requisites:
    CHEM 1090 Fundamentals of the Physical Universe

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of EDCI 1440: Physical Science in the Elementary School Seminar, the student will:

    1. develop a notebook of ideas for hands-on classroom activities and lists of appropriate children’s books, source books, and materials
    2. create a starter collection of rocks and minerals for their classroom
    3. demonstrate an understanding of active, hands-on science teaching by presenting example activities, plus appropriate fillers and puzzlements
    4. demonstrate satisfactory scores on tests and assignments


    Program Outcomes
    Upon completion of EDCI 1440 Physical Science in the Elementary School Seminar, students will:

    Elementary Education

    PO#2 Construct learning experiences based on current best practices, developmental theories, and state and national standards.

    PO#3 Use effective, appropriate, and varied instructional methods to communicate with diverse audiences.

    PO#4 Evaluate instructional methods that connect learning with the students’ diverse experiences and needs.

    PO#5 Implement self-reflection strategies to enhance professional and personal growth.

  
  •  

    EDCI 1450 - Earth Science in the Elementary School


    This course is designed for students majoring in elementary education and is a companion course to GEOL 1070 The Earth: Its Physical Environment.  The course covers the application of teaching basic earth science concepts to elementary education students.  Topics in meteorology, astronomy, geography, and geology are covered.

    Credits: 1

    Instructional Method Lecture/Lab

    Prerequisites:
    Grade of C or better in ENGL 1010 English I and EDFD 2020 Foundations of Education

    Co-requisites:
    GEOL 1070 – The Earth: Its Physical Environment

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of EDCI 1450 Earth Science in the Elementary School, the student will:

    1. develop a notebook of ideas for hands-on classroom activities and lists of appropriate children’s books, source books, and materials
    2. demonstrate their understanding of active, hands-on science teaching by presenting example activities, plus appropriate fillers and puzzlements
    3. demonstrate satisfactory scores on tests and assignments


    Program Outcomes
    Upon completion of EDCI 1450 Earth Science in the Elementary School the student will:

    Elementary Education

    PO#2 Construct learning experiences based on current best practices, developmental theories, and state and national standards.

    PO#3 Use effective, appropriate, and varied instructional methods to communicate with diverse audiences.

    PO#4 Evaluate instructional methods that connect learning with the students’ diverse experiences and needs.

    PO#5 Implement self-reflection strategies to enhance professional and personal growth.

  
  •  

    EDCI 2440 - Classroom Management


    This course is designed to provide an overview of the best practices in both classroom and school-wide discipline models. The course helps students develop a personal system of discipline tailored to his or her individual philosophy and personality as well as to the needs, traits, and social realities of the school and community.

    Credits: 2

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:
    Grade of C or better in ENGL 1010 English I, EDEX 2484 Introduction to Special Education, and EDFD 2020 Foundations of Education, AND grade of C or better in, or concurrent enrollment in, EDFD 2100 Educational Psychology

    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of EDCI 2440 Classroom Management , the student will:

    1. Demonstrate understanding of the basic concepts of historical models of discipline and their contributions to the best of today’s approaches.
    2. Summarize the major points of discipline application models that depict today’s popular views of the purposes, strategies, and techniques of classroom management.
    3. Demonstrate strategies for working effectively with all students.
    4. Explain classroom management strategies and discipline models that are utilized in the local school district.
    5. Articulate his or her philosophy, theory, and practice of classroom management incorporating accepted practices.
    6. Prepare a written classroom management plan that is well organized and attuned to student needs and teacher preferences.


    Program Outcomes
    Upon completion of EDCI 2440 Classroom Management, the student will:

    Secondary Education

    PO#1 Demonstrate an understanding of how learners grow and develop by designing and implementing developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.

    PO#2 Work with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, encourages positive social interactions, and promotes active engagement in learning.

    PO#3 Understand how to apply knowledge and skills to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving.

    PO#4 Understand and uses multiple methods of assessment to monitor learning progress and to guide instructional decision making.

    PO#5 Use a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding and apply knowledge in meaningful ways.

    PO#6 Utilize effective self-reflection to promote continuous improvement, seeks leadership roles to collaborate with classmates and instructors, and hold him/herself to a high standard.

  
  •  

    EDCI 2526 - Designing and Developing an Online Course


    This course is designed for faculty to develop and facilitate an online course. Topics include: analyzing the online learning environment; demonstrating effective use of course management system tools; aligning course outcomes, learning activities, and assessments; creating preliminary documents and activities for online students; providing effective learning resources and activities for the online learner; and incorporating effective learner engagement opportunities for online students.

    Credits: 1

    General Education Requirement: None
  
  •  

    EDEC 1020 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education


    An introduction to the philosophies, goals, and purposes of group settings in early childhood is provided along with an examination of curriculum, facilities, professional opportunities, and teacher competencies and observation in pre-school classes.

    Credits: 3

    Instructional Method Lecture

    General Education Requirement: None
    Prerequisites:

    none



    Co-requisites:

    none



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of EDEC 1020 Introduction of Early Childhood Education, the student will:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of several different types of programs and approaches to teaching young children through text reading, and observation and analysis of programs serving young children.
    2. Identify elements of developmentally appropriate practice in early childhood settings.
    3. Generate appropriate solutions to ethical dilemmas by comparing their observations and readings to NAEYC guidelines.
    4. Identify appropriate learning experiences for young children utilizing strategies from a variety of methods.
    5. Integrate learning experiences into a personal guiding philosophy of education.
    6. Discuss the network of social service assistance available to families.
    7. Identify the practical applications of the NAEYC code of ethics.
    8. Explore current issues and trends in the field of early childhood education.
    9. Analyze a variety of guidance and care techniques in terms of developmentally appropriate practice.


  
  •  

    EDEC 1030 - Infant & Toddler Care


    This course provides information on growth and development of children under the age of three along with curriculum implications; defines the interactive role of the caregiver, and explores other components of infant toddler care including implementation of quality programming and adult interactions.  The course, along with EDEC 1035 - Infant and Toddler Care Lab, meets the criteria for the Wyoming Infant Toddler Credential.

    Credits: 2

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:

    none



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of EDEC 1030 Infant & Toddler Care, the student will:

    1. investigate physical maturation, cognitive and language development, and social-emotional development.
    2. relate diverse perspectives of the family, parent/child/community/school systems, and various approaches to parent involvement.
    3. explain rationale for and implementation of developmentally appropriate practices in the education of infants and toddlers.
    4. evaluate developmentally appropriate curriculum through the facilitation of play and the design of appropriate learning environments.
    5. outline individual and group guidance and problem-solving techniques.
    6. identify the cultural contexts for young children’s growth, development, and learning.
    7. explain rationale for and implementation of best practices relating to infant’s and toddler’s healthy physical development.


  
  •  

    EDEC 1035 - Infant & Toddler Care Lab


    This course is designed to supervise experiences in planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum activities at an early childhood center.  The course serves as a bridge between theory and application through student experiences in the laboratory setting.

    Credits: 1

    Instructional Method Lab

    Co-requisites:

    EDEC 1030 - Infant and Toddler Care (or may be completed in a previous semester)



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of EDEC 1035 Infant and Toddler Care Lab,  the student will:

    1. investigate physical maturation, cognitive and language development, and social-emotional development.
    2. relate diverse perspectives of the family, parent/child/community/school systems, and various approaches to parent involvement.
    3. explain rationale for and implementation of developmentally appropriate practices in the education of infants and toddlers.
    4. evaluate developmentally appropriate curriculum through the facilitation of play and the design of appropriate learning environments.
    5. outline individual and group guidance and problem-solving techniques.
    6. identify the cultural contexts for young children’s growth, development, and learning.
    7. explain rationale for and implementation of best practices relating to infant’s and toddler’s healthy physical development.


  
  •  

    EDEC 1100 - Observation, Guidance, and Assessment of Young Children


    This course explores effective methods of observation and guidance of young children to meet children’s needs individually and in groups. Emphasis is placed on promoting a positive and constructive climate in early childhood settings through positive discipline strategies and appropriate classroom management techniques. Students develop and implement skills to plan effective environments, prepare materials and equipment, develop schedules, explore classroom management techniques, utilize assessment tools, and promote parent-teacher communication. This course includes a field component to provide opportunities for students to apply course principles and theories. This course is designed for those interested or already working in the field of Early Childhood Education.

    Credits: 2

    Instructional Method Lecture

    Prerequisites:

    none



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon successful completion of EDEC 1100 Observation, Guidance, and Assessment of Young Children, the student will:

    1. design a physical and temporal environment.
    2. conduct informal and structured observations.
    3. explore a variety of assessment tools and methods.
    4. apply assessment tools and techniques.
    5. describe aspects of individual growth and development.
    6. create plans for optimizing children’s development.
    7. explain strategies to develop positive interpersonal relationships that include children, parents, and teachers.
    8. identify strategies for promoting positive discipline and appropriate, constructive guidance of young children.


  
  •  

    EDEC 1105 - Observation, Guidance, and Assessment of Young Children Lab


    This course is designed to supervise experiences in planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum activities at an early childhood center.

    Credits: 1

    Instructional Method Lab

    Co-requisites:

    EDEC 1100 - Observation, Guidance, and Assessment of Young Children or concurrent enrollment



    Minimum Student Competencies
    Upon completion of EDEC 1105 Observation, Guidance, and Assessment of Young Children Lab the student will:

    1. demonstrate skills in the observation and guidance of young children and classroom management .
    2. organize the physical environment.
    3. illustrate observation and assessment techniques.
    4. guide individual growth and development.
    5. develop interpersonal relationships including teachers, children, and parents.
    6. promote positive functioning of children in groups.


 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 -> 10